Type 1 Diabetes vs Type 2 Diabetes Differences and Similarities

Diabetes mellitus is a category of metabolic disorders, many of which have widespread elevated blood sugar (glucose) levels due to complications with insulin secretion, its operation, or both. Normally, blood glucose levels are closely regulated by a pancreatic hormone known as insulin. When blood glucose levels increase (for example, after consuming food), insulin is released from the pancreas to normalize glucose levels. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes also arise because the body cannot store and use glucose properly, which is necessary for energy. Sugar or glucose is collected in the blood and does not enter the cells that require it, which may lead to severe problems. Find out the difference between Type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes here.

Type 1 Diabetes vs Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes typically happens first in children and teenagers, but it can also occur in older adults. The immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells in such a manner that they can no longer produce insulin. There’s no way to avoid type 1 diabetes, and it’s also inherited. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 5 per cent of people with type 1 diabetes have (CDC).

Type 2 diabetes is more likely to occur as people age, although many children are beginning to experience it. In this type, the pancreas releases insulin, but it cannot be used efficiently by the body. Lifestyle factors tend to play a role in their growth. About 90–95% of people with diabetes have this form, according to the CDC.

Both forms of diabetes can lead to complications such as cardiovascular disease, renal disease, loss of vision, neurological disorders, and injury to blood vessels and organs. The CDC reports that more than 30 million people are likely to have diabetes, but 25 per cent of them do not know they have diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes

Causes of Type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes

Type 1 and type 2 have separate causes, but all contain insulin. Insulin is a type of hormone in the body. It is created by the pancreas to control the way blood sugar becomes energy.

Causes of Type 1 Diabetes

In this type, scientists conclude that the immune system falsely targets the pancreatic beta cells that contain insulin. They don’t know what causes this to happen, but childhood infections can play a part. The immune system kills these cells, which ensures that the body can no longer make enough insulin to stabilize blood glucose levels. An individual with type 1 diabetes will continue to use extra insulin from the time they are diagnosed and for the remainder of their lives. Type 1 also affects adolescents and young adults, although it can happen later in life. It can start unexpectedly, and it seems to get worse quickly.

Risk factors include

  • Having a family history of diabetes
  • Being born with certain genetic features that affect the way the body produces or uses insulin
  • Some medical conditions, such as cystic fibrosis or hemochromatosis
  • Possibly, exposure to some infections or viruses, such as mumps or rubella cytomegalovirus

Causes of Type 2 Diabetes

In type 2 diabetes, the body’s cells tend to combat the influence of insulin. In time, the body ceases making enough insulin so that it can no longer use glucose efficiently. This means glucose is not permitted to reach the cells. It builds up in the blood instead. It’s called insulin resistance. It can happen when a person has high blood glucose at all times or sometimes. As the body’s cells are overexposed to insulin, they become less receptive to it, or they do not respond at all. Symptoms can take years to grow. People can use medicine, diet, and early-stage exercise to reduce or slow down the risk of the disease. In the early stages, a person with type 2 diabetes would not need extra insulin. However, as the illness progresses, they can continue to regulate their blood glucose levels in order to remain healthy.

Risk factors include

  • Having a family member with type 2 diabetes
  • Having obesity
  • Smoking
  • Following an unhealthful diet
  • A lack of exercise
  • The use of some medications, including some anti-seizure drugs and some medications for HIV

People of some minority groups are more likely to have type 2 diabetes. They include Black and Hispanic people, Native American Indians and Native Alaskans, Pacific Islanders, and some people of Asian descent, according to the CDC.

<<<BENEFITS OF LEMON WATER IN THE MORNING>>>

Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes

An individual with diabetes can experience symptoms and complications due to a lack of blood sugar. Other forms of metabolic syndrome exist with type 2 diabetes, including obesity, elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Inflammation seems to have a role to play. The map below illustrates the signs and complications of type 1 and type 2 diabetes both before and at the onset of the disease.

Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes

Before onset

  • BMI within a healthy range (19–24.9)

At onset

Appearance over several weeks of:

  • increased thirst and urination
  • increased hunger
  • blurry vision
  • tiredness and fatigue
  • numbness or tingling in hands and feet
  • sores or wounds that take a long time to heal
  • unexplained weight loss

Complications

Risk of:

  • cardiovascular disease, including a risk of heart attack and stroke
  • kidney disease and kidney failure
  • eye problems and vision loss
  • nerve damage
  • problems with wound healing
  • Ketoacidosis

Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes

Before onset

BMI above the healthy range (25 or over)

At onset

Development over several years of:

  • increased thirst and urination
  • increased hunger
  • blurry vision
  • tiredness and fatigue
  • numbness or tingling in hands or feet
  • sores or wounds that take a long time to heal
  • unexplained weight loss

Complications

Risk of:

  • cardiovascular disease, including a risk of heart attack and stroke
  • kidney disease and kidney failure
  • eye problems and vision loss
  • nerve damage
  • problems with wound healing, which can lead to gangrene and the need for an amputation
  • Ketoacidosis

<<<BENEFITS OF WAKING UP IN THE MORNING>>>

How are Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes alike?

Both forms of diabetes significantly increase a person’s risk of severe complications. While screening and disease control can prevent complications, diabetes remains the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure. It appears to be a vital risk factor for heart disease, stroke, and foot or leg amputations.

Diagnosis

The onset of type 1 diabetes is typically abrupt. If signs are present, the person should contact the doctor as soon as possible. An individual with prediabetes, which is the early stage of type 2 diabetes, and the early stage of type 2 diabetes, will have no symptoms, although a normal blood test will indicate that blood sugar levels are elevated. People with obesity and other risk factors for type 2 diabetes should have daily controls to ensure that their glucose levels are stable. If the tests reveal that they are high, a person should take steps to postpone or avoid diabetes and its complications.

Treatment and prevention

There is no remedy for diabetes, but medication will help people control it and keep it from getting worse. Here are a few points about the prevention and control of diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Possible cure
  • There is currently no solution, but life-long therapy will manage symptoms.
  • Gene therapy, regenerative medicine using stem cells, or pancreatic islet transplantation can become an alternative over time.
Treatment with insulin and other drugs
  • Regular insulin injections or the use of an insulin pump will supply insulin, day and night, as required.
  • Other medications, such as pramlintide, can stop glucose levels from increasing too high.
Lifestyle treatments
  • Accept the treatment schedule and the doctor’s orders for insulin and glucose checks.
  • Follow an active, healthy lifestyle to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and other health conditions.
  • Pay heed to the amount of glucose in the workout.
  • Managing blood pressure and elevated levels of cholesterol.
Avoiding complications
  • Pay heed to the amount of glucose when exercising.
  • Follow the recovery plan to think about the symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia and the risks of diabetes.
  • Wear your medical ID.
  • Take precautions to deter infection
  • Get daily eye testing with you
  • Check for injury and get early care
Prevention
  • It is not possible to prevent type 1 diabetes yet

<<<ACTIVITIES TO DO IN THE MONRING>>>

Type 2 Diabetes

Possible cure
  • Currently, there is no solution, but interventions will slow down the process and control symptoms.
  • Gastric bypass can alleviate symptoms in people with extreme obesity.
Treatment with insulin and other drugs
  • Metformin can reduce the amount of sugar the liver produces.
  • SGLT2 inhibitors, DP-4 inhibitors, or alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) can reduce blood sugar levels.
  • Meglitinides or sulfonylureas can increase insulin levels.
  • Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) can increase sensitivity to insulin.
  • Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists can increase insulin and reduce sugar levels.
  • Amylin analogues can reduce blood sugar by slowing digestion.
  • Additional drugs for people at high risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis.
  • Insulin in some cases.
Lifestyle treatments
  • Follow the treatment plan and medical advice. Healthful diet
  • Regular exercise
  • Managing blood pressure and high cholesterol levels
  • Avoiding smoking
  • Knowing the signs of adverse effects and complications.
Avoiding complications
  • Know the signs of possible complications to be ready to take action.
  • Wear a medical ID.
  • Take measures to avoid infections.
  • Check for wounds and seek early treatment.
  • Have regular eye tests.
  • Follow a healthful diet and take exercise to manage cholesterol levels and high blood pressure and reduce cardiovascular risk
Prevention
  • Opt for a balanced diet and daily exercise. Ignore or stop smoking.
  • Seek the directions of the physicians if you diagnose prediabetes.

Diabetes is a very dangerous disease. It is not actually necessary for a person to avoid type 1, but insulin and other medications can help patients control their symptoms and live a regular life. Although all forms of diabetes can be related hereditarily, individuals may both decrease the risk and control the development of type 2 diabetes significantly by maintaining a healthier lifestyle with daily exercise. Anyone with a diagnosis of prediabetes should also make decisions about a healthier lifestyle, as this may limit or remove the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes.

Hope you have understood Type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes. You can find all such information about health education on our website. If you have any queries or questions, do let us know in the comment section below. We answer all the questions and provide information only after thorough research from trusted sources. Send this article to friends and let them know about Type 1 diabetes vs type 2 diabetes.

Recommended For You

About the Author: Abinaya

Abinaya is a strong writer and the content head of Open Education Portal. She specializes in content for teenagers. Abinaya is passionate and extremely fond of anything related to education and jobs. She has been a writer for the past three years and loves to focus her content on teenagers can help them shape their future.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *